Text Analysis for Asia and Beyond

Saturday, January 12, 2019 at 8:00am to 1:30pm

This is a past event.

Popovich Hall, 102

Text analysis is increasingly used by scholars of international relations as a useful tool to study business strategies, political rhetoric and diplomatic interactions. However, most of the existing methods are focused on English texts. This conference will help close the gap in the methodological literature by addressing effective techniques and cautionary tales of text analysis in the three Northeast Asian languages: Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

This conference is sponsored by the USC Center for International Studies and USC Marshall, USC East Asian Studies Center, and USC Shinso Ito Center for Japanese Religions and Culture. 

Flyer

January 11-12, 2019 – Los Angeles, California, USA

Organized by Saori N. Katada, USC School of International Relations, and Nan Jia, USC Marshall School of Business

Please register by Jan. 4, 2019.

Friday, Jan., 11, 2019

1:30–2:15 p.m.   

Keynote Presentation: "How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Text"
Arthur Spirling, New York University, Dept. of Politics and Data Science

2:15–2:30 p.m.   Coffee Break

2:30–3:15 p.m.   "Quantitative Text Analysis in Japanese"
Amy Catalinac , New York University, Dept. of Politics and Data Science

3:15–4 p.m.       "Comparing Audio and Video Propaganda in French and Chinese"
Erin Baggott and Brett Carter, USC School of International Relations

4–4:30 p.m.   Coffee Break

4:30–5:15 p.m.   "Protection on Sale: Evidence from Legislative Deliberations in Japan "
Gabrielle Cheung, USC Dept. of Political Science and International Relations

5:15–6 p.m.   "Does Chinese Social Media Play an Effective Monitoring Role against the Biased Reporting of Corporate News by State-controlled Traditional Media?"
T.J. Wong, USC Leventhal School of Accounting  

 

Saturday, Jan. 12, 2019

8–9 a.m.   Breakfast

9–9:45 a.m. "Intentional Control of Type I Error over Unconscious Data Distortion: A Neyman-Pearson Approach to Text Classification"
Xin Tong, USC Marshall School of Business

9:45–10:30 a.m. "Mapping the Allegiance of Authoritarian Media in Vietnam"
Duy Trinh, UC San Diego, Dept. of Political Science

10:30–11 a.m.   Coffee Break

11:00–11:45 a.m.  "From Riot Police to Tweets: How World Leaders Use Social Media During Contentious Politics"
Pablo Barbera*, London School of Economics, Department of Methodology
*Co-authored with Evgeniia Iakhnis, Thomas Zeitzoff and Anita Gohdes

11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m.   Lunch & Round Table Discussion  

Discussants:

Erin Baggott, USC School of International Relations

Pablo Barbera, London School of Economics, Dept. of Methodology

Brett Carter, USC School of International Relations

Amy Catalinac, New York University, Dept. of Politics and Data Science

Gabrielle Cheung, USC Dept. of Political Science and International Relations

Nan Jia, USC Marshall School of Business

Saori N. Katada, USC School of International Relations

Arthur Spirling, New York University, Dept. of Politics and Data Science

Xin Tong, USC Marshall School of Business

Duy Trinh, UC San Diego, Department of Political Science

T.J. Wong, USC Leventhal School of Accounting

Yanhui Wu (TBC), USC Marshall School of Business

Lucy Xia (TBC), Stanford University, Dept. of Statistics

For more information, contact cis@dornsife.usc.

 

Event Type

Conference/Symposia

Audience

Students, Alumni, Faculty/Staff

Campus

University Park Campus

Website

https://dornsife.usc.edu/cis/text-ana...

Department
Shinso Ito Center for Japanese Religions and Culture
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